11.22.2021

How and when was glass first made? What game is drug research most like? ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of November 15-21 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, find out some of the potential explanations why diplomats around the world are falling ill from 'Havana Syndrome' and get the lowdown on the new Covid drugs that are actually looking useful. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

Glass is a vital material - but when and how did it originate?

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11.15.2021

How can chemistry reduce cities' carbon emissions? Does cosmology prove the existence of God? ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of November 8-14 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, find out about England's plans to use e-cigarettes to stop people smoking, and the struggle of US school nurses against Covid-19 and angry parents. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

England will allow doctors to prescribe vaping devices

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11.08.2021

Is space lettuce safe to eat? How does the coronavirus stay a step ahead? ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of November 1-7 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, find our how a drug derived from magic mushrooms helps depression, and learn about a new $11 billion telescope. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?


Used in small amounts in the proper way, psilocybin, 
the psychoactive chemical in magic mushrooms, can be an antidepressant

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11.01.2021

Can animals be depressed? Why do autumn leaves turn red? ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of October 25-31 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, find our why some people don't seem to age, and learn about the deadly microbe spread by aromatherapy sprays. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?


Changing leaf colour is one of autumn's delights. 

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10.25.2021

How does the new COVID drug work? Why do clouds stay in the air? ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of October 18-24 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, find out how we can avoid being killed by an asteroid and how scientists have simulated a star exploding on Earth. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?


Molnupavir mimics the bulding blocks of the SARS-CoV-2 virus's genetic code.
Image credit: Compound Interest, used under Creative Commons CC-BY-ND 2.0 licence.

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10.18.2021

Can mammals glow in the dark? What is Ivermectin good for? ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of October 11-17 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, find out whether dogs could be used to expose murderers, and the three 'simple' steps we'd need to take to colonise Mars. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

Researchers discovered the springhare’s fluorescent abilities entirely by accident.
Credit: Olson et al. 2021 (CC BY 4.0)


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10.11.2021

What happened in the Nobels? What's new with gooey hagfish slime? ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of October 4-10 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's edition of the best of science news from around the world, discover what's next for mRNA vaccines after their impressive performance in COVID-19, and learn about why giant clams are bigger than ever. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

Click to read the details - you'll need them! 
Image credit: Compound Interest used via CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 licence

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10.04.2021

How do deer pause pregnancy? How close is fusion power? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of September 26-October 3 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's edition of the best of science news from around the world, discover how the secret of some strange balancing stones and why so many kids may be getting COVID-19 without showing symptoms. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

Sadly, fusion power is pretty far from being ready to plug into the grid
Image credit Eurofusion used via Creative Commons CC-BY-4.0 licence

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9.27.2021

What is Google's time crystal? Can slime moulds remember? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of September 20-26 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's edition of the best of science news from around the world, discover how you can 3D print food with lasers, and why astronomers are sending a new telescope into space. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

In order to detect the most distant and oldest galaxies, 
the telescope needs to be huge and kept extremely cold. 
NASA/Chris Gunn, CC BY

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9.20.2021

How literally does music heal your heart? What is the physics anomaly no-one is talking about? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of September 13-19 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's edition of the best of science news from around the world, discover why that fancy sourdough bread might not be so unique, and learn about what listening to the stars can tell you. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

Maybe that sourdough yeast starter isn't as unique as people say. 

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9.13.2021

Why are cows bad for climate change? Why aren't dahlia flowers blue? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of September 5-12 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's  edition of the best of science news from around the world, discover an entertaining new cure for blocked noses, and aggressive courtship behaviour in dinosaurs. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

Chemistry is responsible for flower colour. Image credit: Compound Interest

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9.06.2021

Could free school lunches have lifelong health benefits? Why don't kids get as sick as adults from the coronavirus? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 30 - September 5 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's bitesize edition of the best of science news from around the world, discover how researchers could be using your Facebook data for scientific research, and discover the sweet secrets of beetroot and what the link is between it and the smell of rain on a dry surface. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

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8.30.2021

Do we need COVID-19 booster jabs? How is quantum mechanics weird and not weird? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 23-29 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's edition of the best and brightest from science news around the world, discover whether the protective bubble Ryan Reynolds uses in the film 'Free Guy' would really work and hear about new Alzheimers' disease findings. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

You too can crochet molecules that can't be superimposed onto each other
Image credit Natalie Fey at Picture It Chemistry used via CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 licence     
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    8.23.2021

    Why do some people prefer conspiracy theories? How can you ace physics class? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 16-22 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

    In this week's edition of the best and brightest from science news around the world, discover why food germs love melted ice cubes, and why dark energy is probably a real thing. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

    Why does a drug extend fear memory at some points of the month in female mice, but always shorten it for male mice? Image by sibya from Pixabay
    Why does a drug improve ability to recall and predict traumatic 
    events at some points of the month in female mice, 
    but always reduce it for male mice? Image by sibya from Pixabay

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    8.16.2021

    How do bacteria clean up our water? How do giraffes get blood to their heads? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 9-15 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

    In this week's edition of the best and brightest from science news around the world, discover the mysterious constant that makes the universe expand, and how a chemistry journal used art to promote diversity. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

    Discover the innermost secrets of giraffes' hearts. 
    Image credit: magnetismus used via 
    Flickr Creative Commons CC BY 2.0 license

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    8.09.2021

    See a moon forming, and find out why pandemics come in waves in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 2-8 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

    In this week's edition of the best and brightest from science news around the world, discover bacteria that can chomp through metal and plastic, and how volcanic eruptions are set to cause chaos. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?


      This image, taken with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), shows a close-up view on the moon-forming, circumplanetary disc surrounding PDS 70c. Credit: ALMA/ESO/NAOJ/NRAO/BENISTY ET AL.

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      8.02.2021

      What's the surprise about how Tokyo Olympic medals are made? What can we learn from the Florida tower block collapse? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 25-August 1 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's edition of the best and brightest from science news around the world, discover why an asteroid strike is like a pandemic and what's happening on Venus's surface. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

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      7.26.2021

      Could the Olympics be an evolutionary event for the coronavirus? How did the Delta variant come about? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 19 - July 25 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's edition of the best and brightest from science news around the world, explore how the film Tenet addresses entropy and Maxwell's demon, and find out how two cups of coffee could reduce the risk of renal cancer. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
      Whenever you get many people together, there’s the opportunity for large outbreaks—not just super-spreading events, but also multiple generations of transmission, and the infections can then be passed on when people return home,” says Sarah Cobey, an epidemiologist and evolutionary biologist at the University of Chicago.
      Credit: Jota @ BRAZIL via Flickr (Public Domain)
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      7.19.2021

      Does the Moon have an atmosphere...and a tail? What does your dog's chewing behaviour say about their intelligence? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 12 - July 18 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's physics-flavoured edition of the best from the world of science news, find out whether asteroid impacts could be instrumental in creating life, and discover early physicists' dreams of nuclear-powered space flight. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

      Sodium atoms are knocked out of the Moon’s atmosphere by the Sun, creating a tail.
      Credit: James O’Donaghue, Based on work by Jody K Wilson (CC BY SA)
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      7.12.2021

      How can ice be bendy? What does Sweden's Covid strategy tell us about ageism? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 5 - July 11 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's best in class from the world of science news around the world, discover the opioid responsible for face recognition and find out what the heaviest, smallest white dwarf found to date means for science. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

      When grown in tiny strands, ice can bend and then snap back into its original shape. These microfibres are the most flexible form of ice ever made.
      Credit: pdh96 via Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

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      7.05.2021

      How does class affect how much sleep you get? Could sugary drinks be causing colon cancer in young people? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 28 - July 4 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's cream of the crop of science news from around the world, discover the unsung hero behind every coronavirus survival story: our immune systems, and explore the growing link between gut microbiome and mental health. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
      Inadequate sleep among low-income adults and racial minorities contributes to higher rates of illnesses, including cardiovascular disease and dementia.
      Credit: Jeffery Bennett via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)
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      Check back next week for more great picks!

      6.28.2021

      What's the connection between lobsters and telescopes? What's the science of sugar syrups? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 21 - June 27 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's edition of the best and brightest from the world of science news, discover the extremely important physics behind beer-mat flipping, and meet 'Dragon Man', a controversial new ancient human fossil specimen. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
      The unique positioning of lobster eyes enables an 180-degree field of view, and has been mimicked to improve telescopes.
      Credit: Henry Burrows via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)
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      6.21.2021

      Is infinite economic growth possible? How do bacteria mix their genomes with their partners? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 14 - June 20 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's installment of the very best of science news from around the world, get the low-down on Covid-19: discover its origins, find out about its natural hosts and get up to date with the latest news on the Delta variant. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

      Even “sustainable” technologies such as electric vehicles and wind turbines face unbreachable physical limits and exact grave environmental costs.
      Image credit: OTA Photos via Flickr (CC BY SA 2.0)

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      6.14.2021

      What do atoms really look like? Is the Tokyo Olympics at risk of being a superspreader event? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 7 - June 13 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, discover the field of galactic archeology and what it can tell us about the Milky Way, and find out why sea mammals don't really get cancer. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

      “We’re chasing speckle patterns that look a lot like those laser-pointer patterns that cats are equally fascinated by,” Professor Muller said.
      Credit: 
      Chen et al., doi: 10.1126/science.abg2533 via Sci-news.com

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      6.07.2021

      Could binge-watching TV be hastening cognitive decline? What's the point of periods? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of May 31 - June 6 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, find out how much artefacts from the history of physics are going for at auction, and discover how to weigh water with a paper clip. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

      Scientists found that those who reported moderate to high levels of TV time experienced roughly a 7% increase in cognitive function decline over a 15 year period compared to those that reported lower levels of TV-watching.
      Credit: oddharmonic via Flickr (CC BY SA 2.0)

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