12.11.2017

Why is the brain of a murdering ex-NFL player important? Why are computer games big news for medicine? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of December 4-10 2017 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

Important findings in neuroscience, including how gaming can be useful; some cold hard food and drink posts for the Northern hemisphere winter; and some great arguments against the weird idea the Earth is flat. These are among the topics covered by picks the ScienceSeeker editors have made of their favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise. Here is the full round-up of the Science Seeker Editors’ Selections for the past week:
Supercooled water freezes quickly. Credit: Physics Buzz

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12.04.2017

Dogs or cats, which is smarter? How does Tinder hook its users? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of November 27-December 3 2017 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

How Tinder and other smartphone apps affect our brains; the surprising effects our diets can have on the environment; and lessons from nature on how to fight climate change. These are among the topics covered by picks the ScienceSeeker editors have made of their favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise. Here is the full round-up of the Science Seeker Editors’ Selections for the past week:
Image copyright Compound Interest, used under Creative Commons licence.
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11.27.2017

How does flu work? What's the science of gingerbread? Find out in our November 20-26 2017 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

Can we understand our minds well enough to use the knowledge to transform legal systems - and could Harry Potter-style technology help? This, wintry and festive science, climate change, and the politics of science are among the topics covered by picks the ScienceSeeker editors have made of their favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise. Here is the full round-up of the Science Seeker Editors’ Selections for the past week:
Image credit: Arthur Toga
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11.20.2017

Which crabs kill birds? Are there more pesticides in food? Find out in our November 13-19 2017 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

Awesome things are happening in space, and in Earth's history - but perhaps we should pay more attention to what's happening here now? These themes and many others are covered by picks the ScienceSeeker editors have made of their favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise. Here is the full round-up of the Science Seeker Editors’ Selections for the past week:

If only nature was all as tough as this. Credit:  JANOS/ISTOCKPHOTO
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11.13.2017

What if China finds aliens? And where should you keep tomatoes? Find out in our Nov 6-12 2017 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

What sends shivers down your spine? Art and music, or maybe the chance of finding aliens? This week, the ScienceSeeker editors pick include these and many other subjects in their favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise. Here is the full round-up of the Science Seeker Editors’ Selections for the past week:

Credit: June Yarham, used under Flickr CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 licence

Credit: NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory
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11.06.2017

How old is life? Could we drink the ocean more easily? Find out in our Oct 30-Nov 5 2017 #sciseekpicks #scicomm





In the world of science, poop can be data, and we can tell when wine has too much water. This week, the ScienceSeeker editors pick include these and many other subjects in their favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise. Here is the full round-up of the Science Seeker Editors’ Selections for the past week:
Image credit Hilda Bastian, used under CC BY-NC-ND license

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11.03.2017

When scientists disagree: 5 (or 6) steps to understanding scientific controversy

With real scientists, the gloves are off. Credit: Ryan McGuire/StockSnap
by Gaia Cantelli, PhD

US scientists’ research on how to promote healthy eating in schools is deeply flawed, watchdog researchers have found. The original studies gained much media attention, secured millions of dollars in funding and are being implemented in thousands in schools. But independent scientists have found that they are filled with problems, including mathematical impossibilities and duplications. 

If you ever look up scientific theories online, it won’t be long until you encounter at least one story like this. Because science is a living subject and constantly evolving, scientists will inevitably disagree and controversy will arise. Choosing who to believe when you are not a subject expert yourself is tricky and confusing, especially if you are trying to use science to make an important decision. Here are 5 (or maybe 6) steps you might want to consider to make up your mind.