8.03.2020

What is a megaripple? How do sperm swim? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 27 - August 2 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this weeks' bumper edition of the best and brightest from the world of science news, find out how a profound lack of understanding about how science works drives the formation of conspiracy theories, and discover how 3D modelling is uncovering a possible link between the herpes virus and Alzheimer's. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Megaripples range from 30 centimeters (1 foot) to tens of meters across and are proof that Mars is windier than previously thought.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona (Public Domain)
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7.27.2020

Could the sun be causing earthquakes? How is the Red Maple Tree helping in the fight against Alzheimer's? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 20 - 26 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's pick of the best articles covering science news from around the globe, explore the disturbing finding that sometimes planting trees doesn't help trap carbon, and find out how best to see the decade's most spectacular comet, NEOWISE (only for those in the Northern hemisphere, sorry).  ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
A new study published in Nature's Scientific Reports argues that there is a statistically significant correlation of earthquake clusters with powerful eruptions on the Sun, even if it is still unclear how the two phenomena are connected.
Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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7.20.2020

How is the coronavirus mutating, and into what? How could mistrust of a vaccine hinder immunity? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 13 - 19 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, learn about the colours and concerns behind modern tattooing, and explore how living with uncertainty, scientific and otherwise, can help us to have a more realistic expectation of what is knowable and unknowable. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
A growing number of polls find so many people saying they would not get a coronavirus vaccine that its potential to shut down the pandemic could be in jeopardy.
Credit: EU Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid via Flickr (CC-BY-ND)
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7.13.2020

What are the mathematics behind herd immunity? How does caffeine work? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 6 - 12 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best from the world of science news, explore how T cells may be the key to combating coronavirus, and meet Kongonaphon kely, or 'tiny bug slayer', a newly discovered tiny relative to dinosaurs and their flying cousins, pterosaurs. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Caffeine is a central nervous stimulant that 'takes the brakes off' of your brain.
Credit: nicolethewholigan via Flickr (CC-BY 2.0)
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7.06.2020

How many chemicals are in the foods you eat? How do black widow spiders choose a mate? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 29 - July 5 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, find out how fish farming is contributing to antibiotic resistance and explore the evolution of the space suit. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
    Your food is full of chemicals! I mean, it has to be, otherwise it wouldn't be food.
    Credit: Unknown (Public Domain)
To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

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