5.21.2018

Can memories be transferred? Is there a loneliness epidemic? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of May 14-May 20 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

Ebola is rearing its head again, but World Health Organization experts say it's not yet a global emergency, while we also now have a vaccine ready to fight it with. These subjects and many other topics are among ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
An Aplysia sea slug (or sea hare), the species which
scientists claim to have transferred memories between
members of.
Credit: Géry Parent, used via Flickr CC BY-ND 2.0 licence.
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5.14.2018

Could a hangover cure finally be on the way? What is time? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of May 7-May 13 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

We worry about the environment - but in Sumatra and the Antarctic we've had some wins, and gene editing, psychology, and space offer potential ways out - or possibly just new problems. These subjects and many other topics are among ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
Could we avoid feeling like this if we drink too much?
Image credit: Mislav Marohnić used via Flickr CC BY 2.0 licence
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5.07.2018

What's the latest theory on consciousness? Can dogs understand us? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of April 30-May 6 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

While we are learning more about how the moist warmth of a sauna is good for us, we have also discovered that the fact we live in cold climates seems to have given humans migraines. Also: contact lenses that turn eyes into lasers! Yes, really! These subjects and many other topics are among ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
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4.30.2018

How can you remember dreams? Can chocolate boost your memory? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of April 23-29 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

Space is beautiful, mind-bogglingly enormous - but also kind of funky-smelling on one of our notorious solar system neighbours. These subjects, a number of intriguing life hacks, and many other topics are among ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:



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4.23.2018

How do we find new stars and planets? How does meditation benefit people? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of April 16-22 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

Meditation can apparently influence gene expression and enables attention without control - or can it? These and many other topics are among ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
Stellar scientist Annie Jump Cannon
used star-hunting techniques that
are still to be found in software
named after her



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4.19.2018

Causation vs Correlation: How tell when someone's trying to feed you baloney

Don't fall for people misusing evidence to
tell you what you're doing is wrong.
Credit: Arlette Cifuentes Meneses via Flickr CC BY 2.0 licence.
by Gaia Cantelli, PhD

Last time that somebody told you that what you were doing was bad, did they offer evidence - and did you believe it? 

In an age obsessed with fake facts, hopefully you have an armour of skepticism forming already. But here's a chink in the armour you may not have thought of: perfectly true facts can also be warped to manipulate people. One of the most common ways to do this is by mixing up causation and correlation.

Causation and correlation are both extremely boring statistical words that underlie very simple concepts. Two events are correlated if they happen at the same place, or at the same time. For example, in children, shoe size is most likely correlated with the number of books they have read – older children have both read more books and have bigger feet. The two things do not cause each other but do happen at the same time. Causation, on the other hand, means that one of the two events is happening because of the other. For example, students who do better in exams also have a higher acceptance rate into college - because grades are one of the things that college considers when evaluating an applicant.

4.16.2018

What do coffee, ayahuasca, and being ill do to our brains? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of April 9-15 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

From South American psychedelic substances to coffee to sickness, many things in our world influence how we think and who we are. These and many other topics are among ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
This neutron star is glitching. Image credit:
NASA/CXC/University of Toronto/M. Durant, et al.
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