1.21.2019

How can you age gracefully? Should you worry about artificial sweeteners? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of January 14-20 2019 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm

This week's best science posts include new treatment hope for kids with cancer, a positive use for old oil industry equipment, and the birth of a planetary system weirder even than anything from Star Wars, But there are other important topics touched on in the ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
  • A timeline of the discoveries of the chemical elements by Andy Brunning at Compound Interest

  • Credit Andy Brunning, Compound Interest
    Check back next week for more great picks!

    1.17.2019

    The ScienceSeeker Awards 2019 are open for entry!

    After a successful relaunch of the ScienceSeeker Awards last year, we're delighted to announce that it now returns for its third iteration! We hope that these awards will be a way to feature several of the most outstanding blog posts, podcasts, or videos from the past year, and highlight the widespread talent in the science blogosphere that ScienceSeeker seeks to promote.

    There will be a total of nine categories, from each of which there will be one winner. We will then pick the overall winner from among the winners from each category. The posts will be judged by the ScienceSeeker editorial team. There will be no prizes other than a badge for your website and the kudos of knowing that the ScienceSeeker team liked your post most. The categories are:
    • General science posts and graphics: Including posts from sites that correspond to our art, photography, general science and science communication bundles
    • Cells and molecules: Including posts from sites that correspond to our biotechnology, cell biology, chemistry, and microbiology bundles
    • Humanities: Including posts from sites that correspond to our development, economics, ethics, gender, history, language, law, philosophy, policy, political science, religion and atheism, social science and sociology bundles.
    • The environment and our place in it: Including posts from sites that correspond to our anthropology, archaeology, climate science, conservation, evolution, geography, geosciences, oceanography, palaeontology and oceanography bundles.
    • Health, medicine and brain science: Including posts from sites that correspond to our clinical research, clinical psychology, health, medicine, neuroscience, nutrition, psychiatry, psychology, public health and veterinary medicine bundles. 
    • Academia: Including posts from sites that correspond to our academic life, student life, grants, career, education, publishing and library science bundles.
    • Podcast: Including posts from sites that correspond to our podcast bundle.
    • Physical sciences and technology: Including posts from sites that correspond to our artificial intelligence, astronomy, computer science, energy, engineering, mathematics and physics bundles.
    • Big biology: Including posts from sites that correspond to our behavioural biology, biology, ecology, marine biology and plant science bundles.
    How does the nomination process work?

    The nomination process will run from January 17, 2018 through midnight Pacific Standard Time on March 1, 2018, so, really, the evening of February 28 is the time for last minute nominations.


    Individuals can nominate their best post of the year in only one category. The first nomination received from any individual will be the only one considered. Multiple posts can be nominated from the same site – prizes will be awarded to the individuals that created the post. In the event that there is a joint post, that will be the only post considered by the individuals involved. So, you can submit a post you created by yourself or jointly, but not both.

    The ScienceSeeker team will collectively determine the winner for each of the nine categories, as well as the overall grand prize winner. The winners will be announced on April 1, 2019.

    What posts, or podcasts, or videos, are eligible?

    Any post, podcast episode, or video that was first published between January 1, 2018 and January 1, 2019 are eligible for the ScienceSeeker Awards. The post can be from anywhere, be it a personal blog, an institutional website, or a large media organisation. If you’re entering and are not already in our bundles, why not submit your site here?

    Podcasts should only be entered in the podcast category. Infographics and sci-art should enter in the general science and graphics category. Videos and text posts can enter in whichever subject category is most applicable.

    Any questions?

    Feel free to leave a comment on this post, use the contact form, or tweet us @SciSeeker. For more detailed questions only, email us at sciseekers at gmail dot com. 

    1.14.2019

    What's the good news on cancer? Should we colonise Mars? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of January 7-13 2019 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm

    This week's best science posts include more bad news for our oceans, a rethink of how we look at genetics, and a way to rewire our brains. But there are other important topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
    Tsunami aftermath in Aceh, Indonesia, December 2004.
    Credit Wikipedia/AusAID CC BY 2.0.AUSAID
    Check back next week for more great picks!

    1.07.2019

    What destroyed the world's first empire? How do dogs recognise humans? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the fortnight of December 24 2018-January 6 2019 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm

    Happy new year! This week's #SciSeekPicks cover the fact that 2019 is the International Year of the Periodic Table, debunk the idea that all inanimate objects can be conscious, and the difficulties of diagnosing psychiatric disorders. But there are other important topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
    2018 saw many exciting scientific developments
    Check back next week for more great picks!

    12.24.2018

    Should you eat raw cookie dough? What will be 2019's biggest breakthrough? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of December 17-23 2018 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm

    The new film Aquaman is giving ocean scientists plenty to talk about, and we're gradually probing the mysteries of space. But there are other important topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
    Tasty! But can you eat it raw?
    Image credit: cwPhotography
    Used via Flickr CC BY 2.0 Licence
    Check back next week for more great picks!

    12.17.2018

    How can you discover new worlds? Why would you want a snail to crawl on your face? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of December 10-16 2018 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm

    This week's best science posts include the benefits of knowing a second language, and of teens starting school later, and the love story between humans and neanderthals. But there are many other topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
    Junk food: Do we like it, or 'need' it 
    without even really liking it? 

    Snail slime - there's chemistry in this weird cosmetic fad,
    but that doesn't make it scientific. 
    Check back next week for more great picks!

    12.13.2018

    Space: the final frontier-of-the-year quiz

    by Ananya Sen

    The year 2018 saw several unusual discoveries that were made in our solar system and beyond. The findings ranged from explaining historical artifacts to confirming predictions that were made by science fiction enthusiasts. If you consider yourself a space trivia enthusiast or you want a summary of the exciting discoveries that have been made this year, this quiz is exactly what you’re looking for.

    A note on how the quiz works: You choose the answer you prefer, and then carry on reading through the questions and check the answers at the end against your choices. There's no automated scoring, but we hope you enjoy the quiz! Please share how well you did!

    1. Images taken by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft during its flyby of Pluto showed the presence of dunes on Pluto’s surface. This discovery was surprising because there is not much of an atmosphere on Pluto’s surface. What were the dunes made of?
       
       
       
    2. This year scientists were carrying out studies on the black hole that is at the center of our universe. What serendipitous discovery did they make?
       
       
       
    3. The Dark Energy Survey, an international research effort is a five-year project that ended in 2018. In August 2016 they detected something interesting as seen in the animation below. What does it show?

       
       
       
    4. Astronomers have discovered a planet revolving around 40 Eridani A, an orange dwarf star 16 light years from Earth. Which fictitious planet was predicted to be associated with this star?
       Tatooine
       Krypton
       Vulcan

    5. Scientists believe they have finally discovered
       Hydrogen sulfide (farts)
       Methane (marshy land)
       Methanethiol (rotting vegetables)

    6. How many new moons were discovered around Jupiter in 2018?
       5
       10
       15

    7. In 1922 Howard Carter, a British archeologist, discovered King Tut’s tomb. Inside the tomb he found a breast plate which contained a winged scarab, made from a yellow, translucent gemstone. How was this gemstone formed?
       A comet exploded over the Libyan Desert and the resultant heat melted the sand glass forming bits of the gemstone
       It was formed when hot magma was expelled from deep inside the earth’s crust and cooled rapidly in the desert
       The gemstones were formed deep inside the earth and were encased in rocks. These rocks then made their way to the surface and the weathering process released the underlying gemstone

    8. For the past three years two radio telescopes in Tasmania and continental Australia have been arranged to track the Vela pulsar, a neutron star associated with the constellation of Vela. What were the telescopes trying to detect?
       Radio emissions
       A glitch in its normal behavior
       Magnetic fields

    9.Which satellite was launched in 2018 to detect rocky planets around nearby stars?
       TESS
       Horizons-3e
       Skylab

    10. Where on Mars did NASA’s Curiosity rover find organic material in 2018? 
       In the debris of the Hellas Planitia crater
       The soil on the Olympus Mons volcano
       Mudstones on the slopes of Mount Sharp



    The answers:
    Question 1: Pluto's sand dunes are made of frozen methane.
    Question 2: The scientists discovered bright flares from a superheated gas racing around the black hole.
    Question 3: The Dark Energy Survey observed a supernova in 2016.
    Question 4: Vulcan was predicted to be associated with 40 Eridani A.
    Question 5: Uranus smells of hydrogen sulfide (farts).
    Question 6: 10 new moons were discovered around Jupiter in 2018
    Question 7: A comet exploded over the Libyan Desert and the resultant heat melted the sand glass forming bits of the gemstone.
    Question 8: The telescopes were trying to detect a glitch in the Vela pulsar. 
    Question 9: TESS (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite) was launched in 2018
    Question 10: The Curiosity rover discovered organic matter in the mudstones on the slopes of Mount Sharp.

    Ananya Sen is a grad student in microbiology at University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She spends 80% of her time working on oxidative stress in the Imlay lab and the remaining 20% of her time blogging about science, exploring food, taking care of her dog.