7.19.2018

Five reasons why a career in STEM can change your family's trajectory

STEM careers span many parts of life: These scientists
at KU Leuven in Belgium help brewers make better beer.
Image copyright: Andy Extance 
by Gaia Cantelli, PhD

Have you ever thought about a career in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)? You may know that jobs in manufacturing and farming are not predicted to do too well in the coming years. Such change is scary, but it could also be a great opportunity for yourself and for your family. More and more jobs require additional qualifications after high school, so you might be considering going to college, or getting a diploma in something that can help you. This is where thinking about STEM comes into play. Becoming a scientist or a doctor, however, may seem out of your league or too expensive. There are other options that seem more focused on landing you a good job – a job that can help you live a better life than your parents did. A business degree, for example, would scream “employable” from the top line of your resume, right?

Wrong. While in the US business and finance are predicted to open up around 900,000 more jobs by 2022, healthcare jobs are going to create over a million new jobs for nurses and physicians assistants alone. Meanwhile, the same studies showed that there are 1.7 open computing jobs for every unemployed computer science professional, which means that we need more computer scientists! Not only are there going to be many more science and technology jobs in the future, but these jobs are going to be secure and relatively high-paying. They may be your ticket to changing your family’s trajectory altogether.

Working in science is not what TV would have you believe – a bunch of egg-heads nerding out on a university campus. Most STEM professions are normal jobs for normal people. No matter how much time and money you are able to invest in your education, investing in STEM training is a great way to land yourself a bright future. 50% of US STEM jobs are available to those without a four-year degree and can therefore be very efficient and very wise investments, even if your means are limited. In the US, graduates of STEM programs earn on average 10% more than those with similar qualifications in other fields. They also enjoy the security of knowing that their skills are going to be in demand.

Here are a few ideas on how you can start working towards your STEM career right now, no matter where you are in life:

7.16.2018

Is lab-grown meat really meat? Should DNA donors get to see their genome? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 9-15 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

This week's best science posts include stories about weird particles occasionally passing straight through us - some we know are real, called neutrinos, and others we're less certain of, called dark matter. They also include the latest studies on new ways to produce food, and what we should eat and take for health. But there are many other topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
Photodetectors under the South Pole  light up when neutrinos
travel through the ice. Credit: NSF/IceCube
Check back next week for more great picks!

7.09.2018

What's the science of perfect pizza? How did life emerge on Earth? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 2-8 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

Two of this week's best science picks are a little influenced by drugs, with the US authorities approving the country's first drug derived from marijuana, while we also get the lowdown on addiction. But there are many other topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
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7.02.2018

What's the latest on alien life? What happens when a rattlesnake bites you on a vein? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 25-July 1 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

This week's best science news includes many amazing measurements, including whether planets in other solar systems have moons, the magnetism of a supernova, and the carbon contained in a city's trees. But there are many other topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
In this image from the Cassini, backlighting
from the sun spectacularly illuminates Enceladus'
jets of water ice, which contain organic molecules that
may be important for life. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI
Check back next week for more great picks!

6.25.2018

Why can booze or food tempt us? How can AI help betting and medicine? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 18-24 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

I'm fascinated by the question of why, when we know we shouldn't consume something, we so often do. Are there different parts of our selves that disagree? Or are there chemical processes overwhelming us? This is just one of many topics touched on by ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
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6.18.2018

What is the surprising way football can help with health? How can we reach our climate goals? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 11-17 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

Did you know that if the World Cup trophy was solid gold it would be too heavy to lift? Maybe you don't like football - if so we've got some interesting articles for you about how the universe works. These subjects and many other topics are among ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
Image credit: Compound Interest
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6.11.2018

Can we resurrect dinosaurs? How can we use ocean plastic waste? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 4-10 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

As Jurassic World explores the return of dinosaurs that had no problems in killing their prey, could humans in modern society face killing for food too? These subjects and many other topics are among ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
Resurrecting dinosaurs might not be so easy.
Credit: pixabay/azdude, CC BY-SA
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