9.21.2018

Five ways to reach out to your non-science friends

by Gaia Cantelli, PhD

These tips will help avoid that glazed-over, unimpressed look.
Image credit: Quasimime, used via Flickr CC BY-ND 2.0 licence.
It’s every science enthusiast’s nightmare: the glazed-over look of the terminally uninterested. As you talk with your family and friends about current events, the news, things that interest you or even your day-to-day job you will sometimes face anti-science backlash. Whether the people in your life are skeptical or plain uninterested, it can be hard to communicate if they just switch off. Here are a few tips to help you draw them in:

9.17.2018

Why is play good for kids? Where is the new planet humans could live on? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of September 10-16 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

This week's best science posts include cute robots, a bizarre beauty treatment that Kim Kardashian regrets and a new way of looking at time. But there are many other topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
How scientists developed the new antibiotic 
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9.10.2018

When were dark matter and energy created? How do we learn from watching others? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of September 3-9 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

This week, the best science posts include what we can learn from dolphins walking on their tails, how maths helps learn music, and watching eagles online. But there are many other topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
Jocelyn Bell Burnell. 
Credit: Breakthrough 
Prize Foundation
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9.03.2018

How are apps changing kids' reading? What keeps partners faithful? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 28-September 2 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

This week, the best science posts include the lowdown on charcoal as a health supplement, plans to save Earth's biodiversity and an important quantum computing consideration. But there are many other topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
Books still have an important role to play
Image credit: Franklin Park Library
Used via Creative Commons CC BY 2.0 Licence
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8.27.2018

How can we be funnier? What's making animals smarter? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 20-27 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

This week, the best science posts include the discovery of an ancient lost city, a preteen who saved a river and how to cope with anxiety and stress. But there are many other topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
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8.23.2018

Five tips on how to have a constructive science debate

Get your point across effectively, not aggressively.
Image credit: Circuito Fora do Eixo
via Flickr CC BY-SA 2.0 licence
by Gaia Cantelli, PhD

Whether you are a scientist, a science student or a science enthusiast, you probably like to talk about science with people in your life. A lot of science conversations, however, tend to turn into heated debates and, if you are not careful, into full-blown arguments. Many areas of science, such as evolution, stem cell research or global warming can be highly controversial because they clash with people’s moral, ethical or religious beliefs. If you are talking to another science enthusiast, you may disagree about a science article or a piece of science news andon the impact it may have on society.

Here are some tips for you to have a productive science debate with anyone, whether they are a lay-person or a professional in the field. Hopefully these will help you connect with people, get your point across and overcome your differences. 

8.20.2018

Why are some people left-handed? What's behind the surge in celiac disease? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 13-19 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

This week, the best science posts include lessons on biology from large mammals, a plan to explore space that could devastate any alien civilisation it finds and what happens when we sleep. But there are many other topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
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8.13.2018

How can you be invisible to infra-red cameras? How can you keep sperm superb? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 7-12 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

This week's best science stories include a way to save the coral reefs, the low down on NASA's sun-shot, and how scientists can tell how much chocolate you've eaten. But there are many other topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
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8.06.2018

What do dating apps do to our brains? What are the important physics facts you probably don't know? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 30-August 6 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

This week's best science stories include even faster internet, what the latest moist Mars findings mean, and predictions of what life will be like by the end of the century. But there are many other topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:

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7.30.2018

How does saving nature pay off? Which movies do time travel right? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 23-29 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

This week's best science stories include a poisonous item that sounds like it's straight out of a murder mystery, the latest news on Alzheimer's disease, and a podcast with a brilliant story about a pet snail. But there are many other topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
Captive-bred baby giant pandas in the 
captive-breeding facility in Chengdu province, China.
Image credit: Joshua Doubek/CC-BY-SA 3.0 
Credit: Boston Dynamics

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7.23.2018

What happens to our mind when we sleep? Which nearby planet have we found new moons around? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 16-22 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

There's loads happening in space this week, with stars eating planets and fighting their way through clouds of dust - and a new 'oddball' in our solar system. But there are many other topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
When we sleep, we are not as inactive as we look.
Image credit: Travis Swicegood, used via Flickr
CC BY-SA 2.0 licence.
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7.19.2018

Five reasons why a career in STEM can change your family's trajectory

STEM careers span many parts of life: These scientists
at KU Leuven in Belgium help brewers make better beer.
Image copyright: Andy Extance 
by Gaia Cantelli, PhD

Have you ever thought about a career in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)? You may know that jobs in manufacturing and farming are not predicted to do too well in the coming years. Such change is scary, but it could also be a great opportunity for yourself and for your family. More and more jobs require additional qualifications after high school, so you might be considering going to college, or getting a diploma in something that can help you. This is where thinking about STEM comes into play. Becoming a scientist or a doctor, however, may seem out of your league or too expensive. There are other options that seem more focused on landing you a good job – a job that can help you live a better life than your parents did. A business degree, for example, would scream “employable” from the top line of your resume, right?

Wrong. While in the US business and finance are predicted to open up around 900,000 more jobs by 2022, healthcare jobs are going to create over a million new jobs for nurses and physicians assistants alone. Meanwhile, the same studies showed that there are 1.7 open computing jobs for every unemployed computer science professional, which means that we need more computer scientists! Not only are there going to be many more science and technology jobs in the future, but these jobs are going to be secure and relatively high-paying. They may be your ticket to changing your family’s trajectory altogether.

Working in science is not what TV would have you believe – a bunch of egg-heads nerding out on a university campus. Most STEM professions are normal jobs for normal people. No matter how much time and money you are able to invest in your education, investing in STEM training is a great way to land yourself a bright future. 50% of US STEM jobs are available to those without a four-year degree and can therefore be very efficient and very wise investments, even if your means are limited. In the US, graduates of STEM programs earn on average 10% more than those with similar qualifications in other fields. They also enjoy the security of knowing that their skills are going to be in demand.

Here are a few ideas on how you can start working towards your STEM career right now, no matter where you are in life:

7.16.2018

Is lab-grown meat really meat? Should DNA donors get to see their genome? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 9-15 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

This week's best science posts include stories about weird particles occasionally passing straight through us - some we know are real, called neutrinos, and others we're less certain of, called dark matter. They also include the latest studies on new ways to produce food, and what we should eat and take for health. But there are many other topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
Photodetectors under the South Pole  light up when neutrinos
travel through the ice. Credit: NSF/IceCube
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7.09.2018

What's the science of perfect pizza? How did life emerge on Earth? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 2-8 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

Two of this week's best science picks are a little influenced by drugs, with the US authorities approving the country's first drug derived from marijuana, while we also get the lowdown on addiction. But there are many other topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
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7.02.2018

What's the latest on alien life? What happens when a rattlesnake bites you on a vein? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 25-July 1 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

This week's best science news includes many amazing measurements, including whether planets in other solar systems have moons, the magnetism of a supernova, and the carbon contained in a city's trees. But there are many other topics touched on in ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
In this image from the Cassini, backlighting
from the sun spectacularly illuminates Enceladus'
jets of water ice, which contain organic molecules that
may be important for life. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI
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6.25.2018

Why can booze or food tempt us? How can AI help betting and medicine? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 18-24 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

I'm fascinated by the question of why, when we know we shouldn't consume something, we so often do. Are there different parts of our selves that disagree? Or are there chemical processes overwhelming us? This is just one of many topics touched on by ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
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6.18.2018

What is the surprising way football can help with health? How can we reach our climate goals? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 11-17 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

Did you know that if the World Cup trophy was solid gold it would be too heavy to lift? Maybe you don't like football - if so we've got some interesting articles for you about how the universe works. These subjects and many other topics are among ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
Image credit: Compound Interest
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6.11.2018

Can we resurrect dinosaurs? How can we use ocean plastic waste? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 4-10 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

As Jurassic World explores the return of dinosaurs that had no problems in killing their prey, could humans in modern society face killing for food too? These subjects and many other topics are among ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
Resurrecting dinosaurs might not be so easy.
Credit: pixabay/azdude, CC BY-SA
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6.04.2018

Can penguins love? What could transform our view of physics? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of May 28-June 3 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

Space is amazing - but getting off Earth is a big challenge, while staying on a warming planet is no picnic either. These subjects and many other topics are among ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
Love among penguins?
Image copyright cotaro70s
used via Flickr CC BY-ND 2.0 licence
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5.28.2018

How great an exception is the child-rescuing climber? Where might we find alien life? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of May 21-May 27 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

The amazing effort of Mamoudou Gassama to rescue a toddler hanging from a balcony is truly awe-inspiring - but maybe not as unusual as you might think. However it does overshadow otherwise amazing things, like the brain's complexity and the creation of weird-looking moons. Yet these subjects and many other topics are among ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:

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5.21.2018

Can memories be transferred? Is there a loneliness epidemic? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of May 14-May 20 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

Ebola is rearing its head again, but World Health Organization experts say it's not yet a global emergency, while we also now have a vaccine ready to fight it with. These subjects and many other topics are among ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
An Aplysia sea slug (or sea hare), the species which
scientists claim to have transferred memories between
members of.
Credit: Géry Parent, used via Flickr CC BY-ND 2.0 licence.
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5.14.2018

Could a hangover cure finally be on the way? What is time? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of May 7-May 13 2018 #sciseekpicks #scicomm

We worry about the environment - but in Sumatra and the Antarctic we've had some wins, and gene editing, psychology, and space offer potential ways out - or possibly just new problems. These subjects and many other topics are among ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise for the past seven days. Here is the full round-up of the ScienceSeeker Editors’ Selections:
Could we avoid feeling like this if we drink too much?
Image credit: Mislav Marohnić used via Flickr CC BY 2.0 licence
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