9.21.2020

Could there be life on Venus? Are some of the stars in the sky already dead? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Sept 14 - 20 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's very existential selection of the best in science news from science newsmakers, explore the first life on land, as revealed by an ancient microbial fingerprint, and revel in chaos, fractals and complexity as Hannah Pell explores the science behind uncertainty. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

“The next step is to do the basic science needed to thoroughly investigate the evidence and consider how best to confirm and expand on the possibility of life.”
Credit: European Southern Observatory via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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9.14.2020

What (maybe) dictates men's sex drive? What can a smoky bar teach us about social distancing? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Sept 7 - 13 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's edition of the very best from science news around the world, explore how our unique vaccine responses affect vaccine design and testing, and travel to Mars to visit the ancient neighbours, who may have used sulphur as an energy source. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Male sexual desire may be driven by the brain's aromatase (CYP19A1) enzyme.
Credit: jazzmoon12 via Flickr (CC-BY 2.0)

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9.07.2020

How far away is quantum internet? How should we decide who gets a Covid-19 vaccine first? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 31 - September 6 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's bumper edition of the very best on what's happening in science around the world, find out how implementing indigenous wisdom could have helped to prevent the coronavirus, and find out just how pseudoscientists get away with spreading misinformation. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
The development of quantum networks has been hard going, but scientists have demonstrated a new model that connects users 8km away.
Credit: IBM Research via Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)
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8.31.2020

What's the lowdown on Musk's Neuralink? Are probiotics a scam or a superfood? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 24 - 30 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best of the best of science news from around the world, find out about the genetically modified mosquitos released in Florida to curb mosquito population, and take an exciting glimpse into African cultural astronomy, and its implications for perceptions of women. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

The new brain-machine interface has yet to set itself apart from its forerunners.
Credit: Bill Smith via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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8.24.2020

Is sitting the new smoking? How is CRISPR helping to regrow neurons in diseased brains? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 17 - 23 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's cream-of-the-crop of the best science news from around the world, explore how HPV tricks your immune system, and find out why Flat Earth theory, although wrong, isn't necessarily stupid. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

A growing body of evidence links long periods of sitting with poor health outcomes, but why is this?
Image Credit: sunshinecity via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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8.17.2020

What's the lowdown on the Russian coronavirus vaccine? Why did cats start hanging around humans? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 10 - 16 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, find out whether there's such a thing as a 'male or female brain', and explore the surprising ways that a little social interaction can impact your health. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Russia is the first country to come out with a Coronavirus vaccine - but should this speedy result be viewed as a success or with caution?
Credit: Dr. Partha Sarathi Sahana via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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8.10.2020

What is the chemistry behind an ammonium nitrate explosion like the one in Beirut? Who was Deborah Jin, and how did she change quantum physics? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 3 - 9 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's cream-of-the-crop from the world of science news, discover how scientists have found cancer in a dinosaur, and how coyote genomes are diverging between urban and non-urban populations. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Ammonium nitrate is a fertiliser, and if handled correctly is mostly safe. However, if exposed to high temperatures and confined, it can be explosive. Our thoughts go out to those affected by the explosion in Beirut. 
Credit: Andy Brunning via Compound Interest (CC-BY-ND)
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8.03.2020

What is a megaripple? How do sperm swim? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 27 - August 2 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this weeks' bumper edition of the best and brightest from the world of science news, find out how a profound lack of understanding about how science works drives the formation of conspiracy theories, and discover how 3D modelling is uncovering a possible link between the herpes virus and Alzheimer's. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Megaripples range from 30 centimeters (1 foot) to tens of meters across and are proof that Mars is windier than previously thought.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona (Public Domain)
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7.27.2020

Could the sun be causing earthquakes? How is the Red Maple Tree helping in the fight against Alzheimer's? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 20 - 26 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's pick of the best articles covering science news from around the globe, explore the disturbing finding that sometimes planting trees doesn't help trap carbon, and find out how best to see the decade's most spectacular comet, NEOWISE (only for those in the Northern hemisphere, sorry).  ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
A new study published in Nature's Scientific Reports argues that there is a statistically significant correlation of earthquake clusters with powerful eruptions on the Sun, even if it is still unclear how the two phenomena are connected.
Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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7.20.2020

How is the coronavirus mutating, and into what? How could mistrust of a vaccine hinder immunity? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 13 - 19 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, learn about the colours and concerns behind modern tattooing, and explore how living with uncertainty, scientific and otherwise, can help us to have a more realistic expectation of what is knowable and unknowable. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
A growing number of polls find so many people saying they would not get a coronavirus vaccine that its potential to shut down the pandemic could be in jeopardy.
Credit: EU Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid via Flickr (CC-BY-ND)
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7.13.2020

What are the mathematics behind herd immunity? How does caffeine work? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 6 - 12 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best from the world of science news, explore how T cells may be the key to combating coronavirus, and meet Kongonaphon kely, or 'tiny bug slayer', a newly discovered tiny relative to dinosaurs and their flying cousins, pterosaurs. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Caffeine is a central nervous stimulant that 'takes the brakes off' of your brain.
Credit: nicolethewholigan via Flickr (CC-BY 2.0)
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7.06.2020

How many chemicals are in the foods you eat? How do black widow spiders choose a mate? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 29 - July 5 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, find out how fish farming is contributing to antibiotic resistance and explore the evolution of the space suit. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
    Your food is full of chemicals! I mean, it has to be, otherwise it wouldn't be food.
    Credit: Unknown (Public Domain)
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6.29.2020

How can Guinea pigs teach us about human history? How are bird watchers working with scientists to promote equality? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 22 - 28 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's cream of the crop of science news from around the world, take a comprehensive journey inside the coronavirus, and explore the lightest black hole yet discovered. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Through tracking the evolution of Guinea pigs, scientists have gained valuable insights into the travels of Americans a thousand years ago.
Credit: Andy Miccone via Flickr (Public domain)
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6.22.2020

What's the link between overactive neurons and anxiety? How is a cheap steroid helping in the fight against COVID-19? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 15 - 21 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, find out how an antibody cocktail reminiscent of the Three Stooges could help to overcome COVID-19, and explore the dangers of global warming as a two-degree increase in global temperature could lead to a tripling of plant disease pathogens. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
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6.15.2020

What are ghost particles and why are they in Antarctica? How does exercise change our blood chemistry? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 8 - 14 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's bumper edition of the best from the world of science news, explore the science at the intersection of the day's biggest topics, coronavirus and racial disparity in America. Why are black communities disproportionately affected by public health issues? ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Ultrahigh-energy neutrinos could help scientists unravel some of the biggest mysteries in astrophysics—and the best place to find them may be the South Pole.Credit: Christopher Michel via Flickr (CC-BY 2.0)
Find out exactly what teargas is, and how to treat yourself and others if you're exposed to it.
Credit: Andy Brunning via Compound Interest (CC-BY-ND)
Ancient tracks reveal a previously unknown creature from the Age of Dinosaurs answering one question but raising more.
Credit: Anthony Romilio University of Queensland (CC BY 2.0)
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