7.06.2020

How many chemicals are in the foods you eat? How do black widow spiders choose a mate? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 29 - July 5 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, find out how fish farming is contributing to antibiotic resistance and explore the evolution of the space suit. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
    Your food is full of chemicals! I mean, it has to be, otherwise it wouldn't be food.
    Credit: Unknown (Public Domain)
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6.29.2020

How can Guinea pigs teach us about human history? How are bird watchers working with scientists to promote equality? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 22 - 28 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's cream of the crop of science news from around the world, take a comprehensive journey inside the coronavirus, and explore the lightest black hole yet discovered. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Through tracking the evolution of Guinea pigs, scientists have gained valuable insights into the travels of Americans a thousand years ago.
Credit: Andy Miccone via Flickr (Public domain)
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6.22.2020

What's the link between overactive neurons and anxiety? How is a cheap steroid helping in the fight against COVID-19? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 15 - 21 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, find out how an antibody cocktail reminiscent of the Three Stooges could help to overcome COVID-19, and explore the dangers of global warming as a two-degree increase in global temperature could lead to a tripling of plant disease pathogens. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
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6.15.2020

What are ghost particles and why are they in Antarctica? How does exercise change our blood chemistry? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 8 - 14 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's bumper edition of the best from the world of science news, explore the science at the intersection of the day's biggest topics, coronavirus and racial disparity in America. Why are black communities disproportionately affected by public health issues? ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Ultrahigh-energy neutrinos could help scientists unravel some of the biggest mysteries in astrophysics—and the best place to find them may be the South Pole.Credit: Christopher Michel via Flickr (CC-BY 2.0)
Find out exactly what teargas is, and how to treat yourself and others if you're exposed to it.
Credit: Andy Brunning via Compound Interest (CC-BY-ND)
Ancient tracks reveal a previously unknown creature from the Age of Dinosaurs answering one question but raising more.
Credit: Anthony Romilio University of Queensland (CC BY 2.0)
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6.08.2020

How dangerous is teargas, especially now with the pandemic? Does observing the Universe really change the outcome? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 1 - 7 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's edition of the most topical science news from around the world, find out how (and why) black Americans are being disproportionately affected by Covid-19, and why the publication of results of some coronavirus studies is being delayed. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Despite chemical warfare being banned by the Geneva convention in wars between countries, many countries still choose to use CS gas on their own citizens.
Credit: Studio Incendo via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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6.01.2020

Why is the wind always in your face while biking? How could your genes be affecting your drinking habits? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of May 25 - 31 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, meet the bacteria that live in your nose, and find out why you might be grateful that they're there, and discover how worms are helping to uncover the link between fat metabolism and sleep. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
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5.25.2020

Is it possible to travel faster than light? What's the likelihood of intelligence beyond Earth? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of May 18 - 24 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's cream-of-the-crop from science journalism around the world, explore the increasingly urgent issues surrounding video surveillance and facial recognition, and discover the ancient Australian megafauna that once roamed the smallest continent. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
If quantum theory is fundamental, the problem with travelling faster than light is the teensy issue of destroying the universe with negative energy. The answer could be wormholes.
Credit: Jason Brennan via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
2.5m tall kangaroos, giant lizards and 7m long freshwater crocodiles - Australia's wildlife used to be even more unique than it is today.
Credit: R Bargiel, V Konstantinov, A Atuchin and S Hocknull (2020), Queensland Museum
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5.18.2020

Where are planets born? How can lasers counteract gravity? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of May 11 - 17 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's digest of the best from the world of science news, find out the good news about how humans make coronavirus antibodies, and the less good news about coronavirus resurgence in countries easing lockdown. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
T-Tauri stars with their accompanying protoplanetary discs. A solar system in the making!
Credit: Garufi, A., Avenhaus, H et al., Astrophysics (2020) doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201936946
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5.11.2020

How are corona vaccine promises fuelling false expectations? What is the pandemic teaching us about community? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of May 4 - 10 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's digest of the best news from science around the world, delve into the mysterious world of plant communication, and meet the Keepers of the Deep, the marine biologists taking care of deepwater coral reefs. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Talk of a corona vaccine as early as Autumn 2020 is unrealistic and could lead to a false sense of security, hindering preparations for a second wave.
Credit: Ikusuki via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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5.04.2020

What does the surface of the sun look like? Why are clinical trials so complicated? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of April 27 - May 3 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's edition of the best and the brightest from the world of science news, find out whether AI could be the key to predicting floods, and why the search for a corona cure is raising a whole host of science ethics questions. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
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4.27.2020

Could cosmic rays be the key to forecasting volcanic eruptions? How can we design cities so that animals and humans can coexist? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of April 20 - 26 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's edition of the best and the brightest from the world of science news, find out how the Hubble Space Telescope has helped contribute to our understanding of the universe in which we live, and discover how Americans have been poisoning themselves in their quest to fend off corona (hint: you should absolutely not inject yourself with disinfectant). ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
A combination of relativistic particles and artificial intelligence may provide a new way to forecast when a volcano could erupt.
Credit: Din Muhammad Sumon via Flickr (CC-BY 2.0)
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4.20.2020

How could changing habits help stop the outbreak? Have we found dinosaur DNA? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of April 13 - 19 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

This week in the best science news from reputable sources around the globe, dig into the sticky subject of wet markets and how they contribute to pandemics, and revisit the Deepwater Horizon disaster, ten years on and explore the continuing effects of the spill. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Jurassic park may (but probably isn't) be only a few years away.
Credit: Kevin Dooley via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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4.13.2020

Why does it smell so good after it rains? When can we lift the coronavirus pandemic precautions? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of April 6 - 12 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

As we enter into the fourth week of quarantine for some, ScienceSeeker's coverage of the best science news from sources you can trust offers you reliable information as the crisis continues to unfold. This week, as well as a wide selection of articles covering corona, explore the finding that space may be different depending which way you look at it. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

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4.06.2020

Why is PPE important for mental as well as physical health? How do ant colonies fight disease? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Mar 30 - April 5 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's cream-of-the-crop of science news from reputable sources all over the world, get the low down about hydoxychloroquine, the controversial malaria drug touted as a corona cure, and explore the unexpected places in space with all the right ingredients for life. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Without adequate PPE, medical workers face legitimate health anxiety about becoming infected and infecting others.
Credit: Marco Verch via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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3.30.2020

Why is everyone hoarding toilet paper? How can fungi help ecosystems recover after bushfires? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Mar 23 - 29 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, explore how scientists came to the conclusion that travel restrictions and social distancing could help slow the pandemic, and delve into the cleaning power of soap: possibly our best weapon in our struggle against disease. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
In times of crisis, it's monkey see, monkey do. Media portrayals of toilet paper shortages cause people to stockpile.
Credit: Sabine Heyer via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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3.23.2020

How does coronavirus testing work? How might hoofed herbivores help keep the permafrost from melting? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Mar 16 - 22 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's predictably coronavirus-heavy selection of the best science news coverage from around the world, explore the impact of the built environment on the spread of the disease, and find out about how you can track Venus across the night sky. A great activity for those of you in quarantine! Our thoughts go out to everyone affected by the virus, and our thanks go to all of those who are doing their part in fighting it. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Get the low-down on how the current testing for coronavirus works, its limitations and future improvements.
Credit: Andy Brunning via Compound Interest (CC-BY-ND)
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3.22.2020

Call for Editors! Become part of the most comprehensive source of science coverage.

Looking for a new challenge or opportunity in 2020?

When it comes to reporting science, the mainstream media can struggle, and often falls into sensationalism, undermining its message. ScienceSeeker is therefore an essential resource, enabling readers to access knowledge that helps make sense of the headlines. We aggregate the most comprehensive list of science blogs, written by a community including top scientists. Every week, our volunteer editors scour what’s been reported to distil it down to the most essential content. We’ve got a vibrant team - but we're still short in some areas.

Would you like to join us? E-mail sciseekers AT gmail DOT com if you're interested or have any questions. Read on for more details:

What is ScienceSeeker?

ScienceSeeker is a unique science blog aggregator that brings together over 2,400 blog sites (and growing!). It emerged as part of the ScienceOnline movement that has energized the science communication community in recent years. Although ScienceOnline is now defunct, ScienceSeeker continues on a sustainable basis thanks to the sterling effort of its volunteer supporters. For more details about what we do and who we are, see our 'About' page.

What does an editor do?

A ScienceSeeker editor commits to spending some of their valuable time reading science blogs or listening to science podcasts and selecting the newest developments in science every week. The commitment depends on circumstances. An especially busy person might be able to make selections from their general reading. An enthusiastic editor might dedicate three hours a week or more to select the most relevant content. Each editor usually focuses on a limited set of subject areas to restrict the time they have to invest, although there are opportunities to help build ScienceSeeker's platform. The goal of this recruitment exercise is to add to the team of editors so that the effort can be shared more broadly.

Who are we looking for?

We are currently interested in expanding the coverage on science discoveries in the areas of podcasts, psychology, neuroscience, mathematics, cell biology, biotech and public health. We also welcome help with curating and/or creating content for our YouTube channel. If you are fond of reading and/or listening to science, it’s your chance to contribute to science outreach by highlighting those pieces you think the society needs to be aware of!

What’s in it for you?

At a general level, it’s rewarding to make an input into a community. In this case you’re helping create an authoritative voice on science that supplements and corrects conventional media coverage. You’re also boosting the reach of individual blogs that might not otherwise be read by many people.

At a personal level, being a ScienceSeeker editor is a relatively low-effort activity that looks good on your résumé. There are also great benefits that arise from the effort invested in reading ScienceSeeker blogs. For scientists and writers, ScienceSeeker blogs often showcase ideas, research and styles of communication that you might not otherwise have encountered that can prove useful in your paid work. And whoever you are, ScienceSeeker blogs are interesting and entertaining – reading them is not a bad way to spend time at all!

Is there a closing date?

No. The ScienceSeeker team is continually evolving, and as such we always welcome enquiries from prospective editors.

3.16.2020

Could we use trees to generate electricity? Have we really found an alien protein inside a meteorite? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Mar 9 - 15 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's coverage of the best from the world of science news, celebrate the earliest equinox since 1896 and inform yourself further about the coronavirus from scientific, reliable sources. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
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3.09.2020

How is ocean plastic contributing to antibiotic resistance? Who is Katherine Johnson and how did she help the US get into space? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Feb 24 - Mar 1 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best science news straight from science newsmakers, get a reasoned look at the coronavirus outbreak from a scientific standpoint, and find out how tropical forests may turn from carbon sinks into carbon sources. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
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3.02.2020

Is the emergence of life inevitable? What are zoonotic diseases and why is destroying the rainforest making them more dangerous? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Feb 24 - Mar 1 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's cream-of-the-crop from the world of science news, find out what the world should do about the seemingly unstoppable coronavirus, and explore a use for essential oils which you might not have thought of - food preservation! ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
The inevitability of life is only true in a statistical, averaged sense. Evolution's directionality is an illusion.
Credit: Text taken from article by Caleb Scharf, Image: Hans Splinter via Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)
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2.24.2020

What's the connection between Parkison's and the Common Cough? Why are fossil fuels more radioactive than nuclear power? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Feb 17 - Feb 23 2020 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm

In this week's picks from the world of science news, explore the worrying findings that the coronavirus may be more contagious than first thought. and find out about the new electron state of matter recently discovered. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

A  common cough medicine, Ambroxol, may hold the key to treating Parkinson's disease.
Credit:  Ryan Boren via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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