9.20.2021

How literally does music heal your heart? What is the physics anomaly no-one is talking about? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of September 13-19 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's edition of the best of science news from around the world, discover why that fancy sourdough bread might not be so unique, and learn about what listening to the stars can tell you. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

Maybe that sourdough yeast starter isn't as unique as people say. 

To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

9.13.2021

Why are cows bad for climate change? Why aren't dahlia flowers blue? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of September 5-12 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's  edition of the best of science news from around the world, discover an entertaining new cure for blocked noses, and aggressive courtship behaviour in dinosaurs. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

Chemistry is responsible for flower colour. Image credit: Compound Interest

To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

9.06.2021

Could free school lunches have lifelong health benefits? Why don't kids get as sick as adults from the coronavirus? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 30 - September 5 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's bitesize edition of the best of science news from around the world, discover how researchers could be using your Facebook data for scientific research, and discover the sweet secrets of beetroot and what the link is between it and the smell of rain on a dry surface. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

8.30.2021

Do we need COVID-19 booster jabs? How is quantum mechanics weird and not weird? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 23-29 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's edition of the best and brightest from science news around the world, discover whether the protective bubble Ryan Reynolds uses in the film 'Free Guy' would really work and hear about new Alzheimers' disease findings. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

You too can crochet molecules that can't be superimposed onto each other
Image credit Natalie Fey at Picture It Chemistry used via CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 licence     
    To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

    8.23.2021

    Why do some people prefer conspiracy theories? How can you ace physics class? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 16-22 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

    In this week's edition of the best and brightest from science news around the world, discover why food germs love melted ice cubes, and why dark energy is probably a real thing. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

    Why does a drug extend fear memory at some points of the month in female mice, but always shorten it for male mice? Image by sibya from Pixabay
    Why does a drug improve ability to recall and predict traumatic 
    events at some points of the month in female mice, 
    but always reduce it for male mice? Image by sibya from Pixabay

    To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

    8.16.2021

    How do bacteria clean up our water? How do giraffes get blood to their heads? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 9-15 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

    In this week's edition of the best and brightest from science news around the world, discover the mysterious constant that makes the universe expand, and how a chemistry journal used art to promote diversity. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

    Discover the innermost secrets of giraffes' hearts. 
    Image credit: magnetismus used via 
    Flickr Creative Commons CC BY 2.0 license

    To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

    8.09.2021

    See a moon forming, and find out why pandemics come in waves in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of August 2-8 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

    In this week's edition of the best and brightest from science news around the world, discover bacteria that can chomp through metal and plastic, and how volcanic eruptions are set to cause chaos. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?


      This image, taken with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), shows a close-up view on the moon-forming, circumplanetary disc surrounding PDS 70c. Credit: ALMA/ESO/NAOJ/NRAO/BENISTY ET AL.

      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      8.02.2021

      What's the surprise about how Tokyo Olympic medals are made? What can we learn from the Florida tower block collapse? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 25-August 1 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's edition of the best and brightest from science news around the world, discover why an asteroid strike is like a pandemic and what's happening on Venus's surface. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      7.26.2021

      Could the Olympics be an evolutionary event for the coronavirus? How did the Delta variant come about? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 19 - July 25 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's edition of the best and brightest from science news around the world, explore how the film Tenet addresses entropy and Maxwell's demon, and find out how two cups of coffee could reduce the risk of renal cancer. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
      Whenever you get many people together, there’s the opportunity for large outbreaks—not just super-spreading events, but also multiple generations of transmission, and the infections can then be passed on when people return home,” says Sarah Cobey, an epidemiologist and evolutionary biologist at the University of Chicago.
      Credit: Jota @ BRAZIL via Flickr (Public Domain)
      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      7.19.2021

      Does the Moon have an atmosphere...and a tail? What does your dog's chewing behaviour say about their intelligence? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 12 - July 18 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's physics-flavoured edition of the best from the world of science news, find out whether asteroid impacts could be instrumental in creating life, and discover early physicists' dreams of nuclear-powered space flight. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

      Sodium atoms are knocked out of the Moon’s atmosphere by the Sun, creating a tail.
      Credit: James O’Donaghue, Based on work by Jody K Wilson (CC BY SA)
      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      7.12.2021

      How can ice be bendy? What does Sweden's Covid strategy tell us about ageism? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of July 5 - July 11 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's best in class from the world of science news around the world, discover the opioid responsible for face recognition and find out what the heaviest, smallest white dwarf found to date means for science. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

      When grown in tiny strands, ice can bend and then snap back into its original shape. These microfibres are the most flexible form of ice ever made.
      Credit: pdh96 via Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0)

      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      7.05.2021

      How does class affect how much sleep you get? Could sugary drinks be causing colon cancer in young people? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 28 - July 4 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's cream of the crop of science news from around the world, discover the unsung hero behind every coronavirus survival story: our immune systems, and explore the growing link between gut microbiome and mental health. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
      Inadequate sleep among low-income adults and racial minorities contributes to higher rates of illnesses, including cardiovascular disease and dementia.
      Credit: Jeffery Bennett via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)
      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      Check back next week for more great picks!

      6.28.2021

      What's the connection between lobsters and telescopes? What's the science of sugar syrups? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 21 - June 27 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's edition of the best and brightest from the world of science news, discover the extremely important physics behind beer-mat flipping, and meet 'Dragon Man', a controversial new ancient human fossil specimen. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
      The unique positioning of lobster eyes enables an 180-degree field of view, and has been mimicked to improve telescopes.
      Credit: Henry Burrows via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)
      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      Check back next week for more great picks!

      6.21.2021

      Is infinite economic growth possible? How do bacteria mix their genomes with their partners? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 14 - June 20 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's installment of the very best of science news from around the world, get the low-down on Covid-19: discover its origins, find out about its natural hosts and get up to date with the latest news on the Delta variant. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

      Even “sustainable” technologies such as electric vehicles and wind turbines face unbreachable physical limits and exact grave environmental costs.
      Image credit: OTA Photos via Flickr (CC BY SA 2.0)

      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      Check back next week for more great picks!

      6.14.2021

      What do atoms really look like? Is the Tokyo Olympics at risk of being a superspreader event? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of June 7 - June 13 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, discover the field of galactic archeology and what it can tell us about the Milky Way, and find out why sea mammals don't really get cancer. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

      “We’re chasing speckle patterns that look a lot like those laser-pointer patterns that cats are equally fascinated by,” Professor Muller said.
      Credit: 
      Chen et al., doi: 10.1126/science.abg2533 via Sci-news.com

      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      Check back next week for more great picks!

      6.07.2021

      Could binge-watching TV be hastening cognitive decline? What's the point of periods? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of May 31 - June 6 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, find out how much artefacts from the history of physics are going for at auction, and discover how to weigh water with a paper clip. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

      Scientists found that those who reported moderate to high levels of TV time experienced roughly a 7% increase in cognitive function decline over a 15 year period compared to those that reported lower levels of TV-watching.
      Credit: oddharmonic via Flickr (CC BY SA 2.0)

      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      Check back next week for more great picks!

      5.31.2021

      How can tripping mice help us understand psychosis in humans? When is the best time to exercise for metabolic health? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of May 24 - May 30 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's very best from the world of science news, discover the possibilities of data storage with DNA and take a look inside the clothing industry, and why finding uses for waste clothing is an important step towards a sustainable future. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

      An increase in dopamine in the brain can trigger auditory hallucinations in mice, according to a recent paper published in the journal Science—a surprising link between how human and mouse minds malfunction.
      Credit: amandil_eldamar via Flickr (Public Domain)

      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      Check back next week for more great picks!

      5.24.2021

      Are girls more empathetic than boys? When do bees smell like bananas? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of May 17 - May 23 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      Welcome to a bite-sized edition of ScienceSeeker, your best source for the newest and most exciting science research from around the world. This week, discover the viruses with a totally different genome to the rest of life on Earth, and explore the fascinating biology of cicadas. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

      Hundreds of studies seem to suggest that girls are more empathetic than boys, but we should be wary of making sweeping generalisations on that basis.
      Credit: Brian Richardson via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      Check back next week for more great picks!

      5.17.2021

      Who walks faster; you or a T-Rex? How many bacteria is your keyboard harbouring? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of May 10 - May 16 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's edition of the best from the world of science news, find out what makes things taste good, and discover the policies that could help to improve plastic recycling. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
      An analysis of the animal’s walking speed suggests that T. rex’s walking pace was close to that of a human.
      Credit: Adapted from Ivan via Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)
      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      Check back next week for more great picks!

      5.10.2021

      What do cats' love of boxes tell us about their sight? How does measuring time increase disorder in the universe? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of May 3 - May 9 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's best from the world of science news, find out how extra-squeaky bats are helping scientists to understand echolocation, and discover the COVID app that tell you when your friends are sick. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

      "It's the presence of the contours, either in the Kanizsa square or in the real square, that causes cats to sit inside, rather than the presence of shapes on the floor,"
      Credit: Andy Miccone via Flickr (Public Domain)

      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      Check back next week for more great picks!

      5.03.2021

      What do women and whales have in common? How metal is the moon? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of April 26 - May 2 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, read about how the first billion COVID vaccinations have been given, and discover why Brazil have rejected the Gamaleya vaccine. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

      • Podcast: Menopause by Dessa for Deeply Human.
      No, it's not a sexist joke. Human women and female whales both go through menopause.
      Credit: Isaac Kohane via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      Check back next week for more great picks!

      4.26.2021

      How can skipping stones help to design sea vehicles and even spacecraft? How can we make sense of the latest CERN findings that challenge the Standard Model? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of April 19 - 25 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's best from the world of science news, explore the amazing breakthrough in malaria vaccination and discover the disturbing link between pregnancy complications and COVID-19 infection. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
      Despite the paper's promising conclusions for other craft, spacecraft landing on water would have to be spinning fast enough that humans inside would experience dangerous G-forces.
      Image Credit: Laughlin Elkind via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      Check back next week for more great picks!

      4.19.2021

      What conclusions can we draw from the J&J vaccine pause? What side-effects can you expect when you're vaccinated against Covid-19? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of April 12 - April 18 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      In this week's bitesize edition of the best science news from around the world, learn about how HIV activists put policies in place that have saved lives in the current pandemic, and explore the weird new type of uranium scientists have just discovered. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

      This week, the FDA and CDC both recommended a temporary pause in distribution of Johnson & Johnson’s one-shot COVID-19 vaccine, after the emergence of a very rare, very unusual blood clotting side effect. 
      Text credit: Article; Image credit: El Alvi via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      Check back next week for more great picks!

      4.12.2021

      What can monkeys teach us about recovering from disaster? Why is daydreaming good, actually? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of April 5 - April 11 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

      Roll up, roll up, for the best science news from around the world, picked out for you by scientists. This week, find out how Covid-19 has been detrimental to bats, and how scientists are hoping that studying bacterial genetics can help to stop another pandemic. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
      Broader and more tolerant social networks helped Macaques recover from disasters,according to a new study.
      Credit: Ravi Jandhyala via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

      To indulge your curiosity even more, follow us on Facebook or Twitter for honourable mentions of great posts that didn't quite make our #SciSeekPicks list this week. Want #SciSeekPicks to help satisfy your scientific curiosity every week? Sign up here for regular notification emails.

      Check back next week for more great picks!