4.19.2021

What conclusions can we draw from the J&J vaccine pause? What side-effects can you expect when you're vaccinated against Covid-19? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of April 12 - April 18 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's bitesize edition of the best science news from around the world, learn about how HIV activists put policies in place that have saved lives in the current pandemic, and explore the weird new type of uranium scientists have just discovered. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

This week, the FDA and CDC both recommended a temporary pause in distribution of Johnson & Johnson’s one-shot COVID-19 vaccine, after the emergence of a very rare, very unusual blood clotting side effect. 
Text credit: Article; Image credit: El Alvi via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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4.12.2021

What can monkeys teach us about recovering from disaster? Why is daydreaming good, actually? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of April 5 - April 11 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

Roll up, roll up, for the best science news from around the world, picked out for you by scientists. This week, find out how Covid-19 has been detrimental to bats, and how scientists are hoping that studying bacterial genetics can help to stop another pandemic. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Broader and more tolerant social networks helped Macaques recover from disasters,according to a new study.
Credit: Ravi Jandhyala via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

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4.05.2021

How could cocoa protect against stress-related heart attacks? What's the low-down on Alzheimer drug hopeful Prevagen? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of March 29 - April 4 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's Easter edition of the best of science news, find out how chocolate bunnies are protected so that they don't crumble (It's physics!) and find out why chemical names are so similar and confusing. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Blood vessel function was less impaired when the participants drank high-flavanol cocoa. They also found that flavanols improve blood flow during stress.
Credit: lolay via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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3.29.2021

How could stem cells help people with epilepsy? What's the environmental impact of disposable masks? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of March 22 - 28 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, find out what happened when people got tired of restrictions in the 1918 flu epidemic (a cautionary tale), and explore the unlikely stars that could really exist, including a star within a star. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Masks are necessary and life-saving, but what should we do with them once they've outlived their usefulness?
Image credit: Marco Verch via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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3.22.2021

What happened to there being 'life' on Venus? Can doing less exercise help you become fitter? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of March 15 - 21 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

Welcome to an exciting space-themed edition of your weekly roundup of science news from around the world. This week, discover the explosive secret hiding at the heart of dead stars, and explore how extreme microbes help us learn about outer space. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

A measurement error in the original paper meant that the authors overstated the amount of phosphine in Venus' atmosphere.
Credit: Kevin Gill via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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3.15.2021

What do we really know about Dark Matter? What can ketchup teach us about physics? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of March 8 - 14 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's digest of the best science coverage from around the world, discover the suprising trend towards giving birth to twins, and explore why, in an age of unrivalled scientific literacy, vaccination hesitancy is still a common occurence. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

The answer: Not much, but we're learning.
Credit: NASA/CXC/M.WEISS; X-RAY (TOP): NASA/CXC/MPE/S.KOMOSSA ET AL. (L); OPTICAL: ESO/MPE/S.KOMOSSA (R)
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3.08.2021

Why are bananas radioactive? Does doodling help you concentrate? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of March 1 - 7 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

Welcome to this week's edition of the cream-of-the-crop of science news the world over. Celebrate International Women's Day by finding out about the women who have contributed to the world of chemistry over the last 100 years, and discover the hidden antibiotic resistance menace in the meat we eat. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
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3.01.2021

Why do some students cheat? What's the link between artificial sweeteners and antibiotic resistance? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Feb 22- 28 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's bumper edition of the very best from science news around the world, explore the brain of a person with anxiety, find out about burnout and whether you may be suffering from it, and discover how the moon might be affecting your sleep. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Sometimes, cheating might feel like it’s the only solution to survive and finish a course among competing priorities.
Credit: ccarlstead via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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2.22.2021

Might we have finally uncovered how antidepressants work? Can lucid dreamers talk meaningfully to scientists in their sleep? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Feb 15 - 21 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, explore the life of Hedy Lamarr, the silver screen actress who made waves in the physics world, and get interplanetary with the Mars rover's  newest shots from space. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

A new paper may hold the key to uncovering how antidepressants work.
Credit:ninachildish via Flickr (CC BY ND 2.0)

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2.15.2021

How do small disease-carrying animals adapt to human environments? Could wearing masks have detrimental effects on babies' development? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Feb 8-14 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

Welcome to this week's edition of the very best from the world of science news. This week, discover the newly uncovered state of matter; the swirlionic state (hint: it's swirly), and get the latest on the Chinese unmanned mission to Mars. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

Small animals from disturbed wild land are more likely to adapt to urban environments, and more likely to carry disease.
Credit: Florida Fish and Wildlife via Flickr (CC BY ND)

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2.08.2021

How does your sourdough starter's place of origin affect its microbiome? What are the myths and truths about vaccine manufacture? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Feb 1 - 7 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's best and brightest from the world of science news, explore consciousness as researchers take a step towards finding its basis, and find out exactly why food sticks to the center of 'non-stick' pans. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Researchers found that on a global level, it was hard to tell the microbes in Parisian bread apart from those found in San Francisco or elsewhere. Sorry.
Image credit: jeffreyw via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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2.02.2021

Call for Editors 2021

 Looking for a new challenge or opportunity in 2021?

When it comes to reporting science, the mainstream media can struggle, and often falls into sensationalism, undermining its message. ScienceSeeker is therefore an essential resource, enabling readers to access knowledge that helps make sense of the headlines. We aggregate the most comprehensive list of science blogs, written by a community including top scientists. Every week, our volunteer editors scour what’s been reported to distil it down to the most essential content. We’ve got a vibrant team - but we're still short in some areas.

Would you like to join us? E-mail sciseekers AT gmail DOT com if you're interested or have any questions. Read on for more details:

What is ScienceSeeker?

ScienceSeeker is a unique science blog aggregator that brings together over 2,500 blog sites (and growing!). It emerged as part of the ScienceOnline movement that has energized the science communication community in recent years. Although ScienceOnline is now defunct, ScienceSeeker continues on a sustainable basis thanks to the sterling effort of its volunteer supporters. For more details about what we do and who we are, see our 'About' page.

What does an editor do?

A ScienceSeeker editor commits to spending some of their valuable time reading science blogs or listening to science podcasts and selecting the newest developments in science every week. The commitment depends on circumstances. An especially busy person might be able to make selections from their general reading. An enthusiastic editor might dedicate three hours a week or more to select the most relevant content. Each editor usually focuses on a limited set of subject areas to restrict the time they have to invest, although there are opportunities to help build ScienceSeeker's platform. The goal of this recruitment exercise is to add to the team of editors so that the effort can be shared more broadly.

Who are we looking for?

We are currently interested in expanding the coverage on science discoveries in the areas of:
  • Computer science
  • Education
  • Psychology
  • Mathematics
  • Oceanography
  • Plant Science
  • Geosciences
  • Science videos
We also welcome help with curating and/or creating content for our YouTube channel. If you are fond of reading, listening to and/or watching science, it’s your chance to contribute to science outreach by highlighting those pieces you think the society needs to be aware of!

What’s in it for you?

At a general level, it’s rewarding to make an input into a community. In this case you’re helping create an authoritative voice on science that supplements and corrects conventional media coverage. You’re also boosting the reach of individual blogs that might not otherwise be read by many people.

At a personal level, being a ScienceSeeker editor is a relatively low-effort activity that looks good on your résumé. There are also great benefits that arise from the effort invested in reading ScienceSeeker blogs. For scientists and writers, ScienceSeeker blogs often showcase ideas, research and styles of communication that you might not otherwise have encountered that can prove useful in your paid work. And whoever you are, ScienceSeeker blogs are interesting and entertaining – reading them is not a bad way to spend time at all!

Is there a closing date?

No. The ScienceSeeker team is continually evolving, and as such we always welcome enquiries from prospective editors.

2.01.2021

How do you turn off a quasar? How are Neanderthals helping us in the fight against the coronavirus? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Jan 25 - Jan 31 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this week's edition of the cream-of-the-crop from science news, explore the exciting progress being made on treating depression with psychedelics, and explore the bias that could be affecting how scientific studies are published. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

OAS1 activates enzymes in our cells that are responsible for RNA degradation.
Credit: Erich Ferdinand via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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1.25.2021

Could an intranasal COVID-19 vaccine be on the cards? Why are horseshoe crabs vital to the biotech industry? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Jan 18 - Jan 24 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

In this weeks edition of the best from the world of science news, meet the ornery octopi who sometimes punch fish just for the hell of it, and discover the huge young black hole that has astronomers shocked. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Intranasal vaccines offer an attractive option in the multifaceted vaccine response to COVID-19.
Credit: Marco Verch Professional Photographer via Flickr (CC BY 2.0)
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1.18.2021

How has chemistry helped to fight the coronavirus? What damage can even moderate alcohol consumption do to your brain? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Jan 11 - Jan 17 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

Roll up, roll up, for another edition of the week's best from the world of science news. In this installment, read about those cute little mastodon babies and why being the biggest shark in the ocean doesn't mean you don't need a nursery. Also this week, read about the world's first artificial beating heart, and what it could mean for transplant patients of the future.ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
Scientists have been instrumental in genotyping COVID-19 and developing a vaccine.
Credit: Andy Brunning via Compound Interest (CC BY ND)

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1.11.2021

What would Earth look like to alien astronomers? How will coronavirus vaccines cope with the new strains? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Jan 04 - Jan 10 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

Welcome to this week's cream-of the-crop from the world of science news! In our picks for this week, learn all about the giant fanged birds that once ruled the sky, and learn how 2020 was the hottest year on record, but a great year for progress in green energy in cities. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?
“What if there were intelligent beings on another planet? And if they were looking at the Earth, which of those star systems could they be living in that would enable them to see Earth?”
Image Credit: Kevin Gill via Flickr. 
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1.04.2021

What are vaccine developers' takes on the new coronavirus strain? How do the Oxford and AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccines work? Find out in ScienceSeeker's picks of the best posts for the week of Dec 28 2020 - Jan 03 2021 #SciSeekPicks #SciComm.

We're ringing in the new year with the first picks from the new (and hopefully less cartoonishly dreadful) 2021. Read a rundown of the good news about the environment from 2020 and explore the weird world of slime moulds, and how they're helping to map the cosmic web. ScienceSeeker editors' favourite posts within their respective areas of interest and expertise also cover many other important and exciting topics. Why not have a read, inform yourself, and indulge your scientific curiosity?

It’s not a “get out of jail free” card for the current wave of COVID-19 cases, and the weeks and months ahead will still be incredibly challenging, but it will hopefully help blunt COVID’s threat later in 2021.
Image and text credit: Andy Brunning at Compound Interest.
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